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Cassava chips and starch global trade

 

Cassava trade is a function of both the production and consumption of cassava-related commodities as well as their substitutes. The expansion of cassava trade since the 1980s has been driven by a number of factors ranging from prices and policy to trends such as gluten-free diets that benefit from high-quality cassava starch. A window into this complex and dynamic commodity landscape can be gained by looking at the changing trade in chips and starches.

Want to know more about cassava trade? Read our blog post: Cassava: Subsistence Crop or Trendy Commodity?

1986–1992: 80’s.
Dried Cassava

1986–1992: 80’s.
Cassava Starch

The European countries’ role stands out. They were shaping a sort of intra-regional trade among them, but in parallel they obtain their supplies from Southeast Asia, especially dried cassava trade. Also the Netherlands’ role is remarkable. They obtain their supplies from Asia, but at the same time re-export to different partners in and outside of Europe. Both dried cassava trade and cassava trade have a similar behavior because they have exporter countries concentrated in that period. In the cassava starch trade, there is a notable presence of LAC countries.

2007–2013: Currently
Dried Cassava

2007–2013: Currently
Cassava Starch

More and more actors, the trade has more countries that take part in the global dried cassava and cassava starch market. It can be noted that as ALC and Africa gain trade network share in that period, it lets them spread and position themselves. Another relevant element is to see dwindling the number of importer countries or partners. So, is it possible to say that cassava is trendy? On the other hand, there are more countries that import both chips and starch and they themselves re-export to other target markets assuming a substantial role as intermediaries.